LINGUISTIC  LISTENING

ASHA Convention: Katie Millican from Wasilla, AK (22 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  SLP Trivia Fun, Erik X. Raj

The only game show podcast on the planet where each and every contestant is a speech-language pathologist.  Listen in on entertaining conversations with some of the most interesting clinicians while they play a fun round of SLP inspired trivia.

Episode:  Katie Millican from Wasilla, AK.  Facts and history about the ASHA Convention, plus other fun speech tidbits.

Become Your School’s Speech-Language Leader (25 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Voices, ASHA

A podcast about how communication changes our lives.  An interdisciplinary look at the speech language hearing professions.

Episode:  A talk with SLP Kim Murza about how, given their large caseloads, school-based SLPs can work smarter not harder to maximize their services. And, Sean Sweeney of the Speech Techie blog shares tools you can use during speech-language treatment.

Being an SLP and a Mom to a Child with an Expressive Language Disorder (29 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Real Talk SLP, The Dabbling Speechie

Felice Clark shares advice on how to realistically tackle all the areas that stress out SLPs. With practical advice, real life stories and solutions to the many problems speech pathologists face every day in the job, Felice and her guests will give you the inspiration you need to take actionable steps with managing your caseload more efficiently. 

Episode:  Felice's friend, Nicole Allison from Allison’s Speech Peeps, opens up about her journey with getting her middle child evaluated for a speech and language disorder. 

The Best Medicine (49 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  If you listen closely to giggles, guffaws, and polite chuckles, you can discern a huge amount of information about people and their relationships with each other.  In this episode, he talks neuroscientist Sophie Scott about the many shades of laughter, from cackles of delight among close friends to the "canned" mirth of TV laugh tracks. 

Better Than Cash (29 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  Our modern world is saturated with awards.  From elementary school classrooms to Hollywood to the hallways of academia, there's no shortage of prizes — and people who covet them.  Yet we rarely stop to ask, do they work?  In this episode, he poses that question to economist Bruno Frey, who argues that awards can have a powerful, positive effect on our behavior — but only if they're designed well.

Can Climate Affect Language? (45 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  Tonal languages evolved mostly in hot and humid places.  What would explain that?

Cognitive-Communication Disorders and the Justice System (34 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Voices, ASHA

A podcast about how communication changes our lives.  An interdisciplinary look at the speech language hearing professions.

Episode:  We’ll meet an SLP and a retired police lieutenant working to de-escalate police encounters by teaching young adults with autism how to communicate effectively with police officers.

Does Language Affect Thought? (47 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  John revisits the popular notion that our language helps shape our worldview.

English Spelling Is A Beautiful Mess (36 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  English spelling is so frustratingly idiosyncratic.  Here's why.

The Home Literacy Environment (24 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Research To Practice, Glean Education

Jessica Hamman interviews education experts to bring their findings, focused on language, literacy, dyslexia, and reading instruction, out of the journal pages and into your classroom.

Episode:  Interview with Marina Puglisi, an SLP and researcher in the area of child language and developmental language disorders, who has investigated the home literacy environment's influence on children's language and literacy development.

How To Deal with an Outrageously Big Caseload (44 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Real Talk SLP, The Dabbling Speechie

Felice Clark shares advice on how to realistically tackle all the areas that stress out SLPs. With practical advice, real life stories and solutions to the many problems speech pathologists face every day in the job, Felice and her guests will give you the inspiration you need to take actionable steps with managing your caseload more efficiently. 

Episode:  So many SLPs are faced with a large caseload.  Many have asked administration for support; some get the support and others are left to manage unruly caseload sizes.  Felice interviews Jenn Westmoreland from Crazy Speech World, who discusses practical tips for how to manage a large caseload and information about how to advocate for your workload and ways to lower your caseload sizes.

The Importance of Phonological Awareness in Reading Instruction (23 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Research To Practice, Glean Education

Jessica Hamman interviews education experts to bring their findings, focused on language, literacy, dyslexia, and reading instruction, out of the journal pages and into your classroom.

Episode:  Interview with Melanie Schuele (Vanderbilt University) about her work on phonological awareness instruction.

Is Social Media Changing English? (40 min)

Posted July 19, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  Our speech is becoming more childlike, but not for the reasons you think.

Lessons Learned From Stuttering Struggles and Beatboxing Sounds (34 min)

Posted October 29, 2019

Podcast:  Voices, ASHA

A podcast about how communication changes our lives.  An interdisciplinary look at the speech language hearing professions.

Episode:  On this episode, we talk with Taro Alexander about the loneliness that can come with growing up with a stutter. Now, his nonprofit, the Stuttering Association for the Young, or SAY, provides a community to a new generation of young people who stutter.  Alexander will receive the Annie Glenn Award for his work with SAY at the 2019 ASHA Convention in Orlando.  Also presenting at convention is a researcher we'll hear from later in the episode. Joined by a former colleague, they'll tell us what MRIs of beatboxers could teach us about speech.

Like-Minded (32 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  A meditation on, like, the word "like."

Losing Face (25 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

​Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  It happens to all of us... someone recognizes you on the street, calls you by name, and says hello.  You, meanwhile, have no idea who that person is.  Researchers say this struggle to read other faces is common.  In this episode, he revisits a favorite 2016 episode about "super-recognizers" and the rest of us.

One Head, Two Brains (51 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  This week, he searches for the answer to a deceptively simple question:  why is the brain divided?  Psychiatrist Iain McGilchrist explains why popular distinctions between the "left brain" and "right brain" aren't supported by research.  He argues that one hemisphere has come to shape Western society — to our detriment.

A Peculiarly Universal Order of Color Words (40 min)

Posted July 19, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  A riot of color.  Our word for "red" predates our word for "blue... and that's true for almost every language!

So... Let's Talk About "So" (38 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  How long have we been starting our sentences with "so?"

The Sorting Hat (51 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  The desire to find our tribe is universal.  We like to know who we are and where we belong.  This fascination has led to a thriving industry built on the marketing and sale of personality tests.  These tests offer individuals – and, increasingly, employers – quick and easy insights that can be used to make some of life's biggest decisions.  But most fail to stand up to scientific scrutiny. In this episode, he revisits the 2017 episode about the world of personality testing, and explore the many different ways we assess personality and potential – from the Chinese zodiac to Harry Potter houses to the Myers-Briggs test.

Swallowing Disorders and Aphasia: Yvette McCoy from Leonardtown, MD (24 min)

October 10, 2019

Podcast:  SLP Trivia Fun, Erik X. Raj

The only game show podcast on the planet where each and every contestant is a speech-language pathologist.  Listen in on entertaining conversations with some of the most interesting clinicians while they play a fun round of SLP inspired trivia.

Episode:  Yvette McCoy from Leonardtown, MD.  Questions on topics such as swallowing, Lou Gehrig's disease, aphasia and more.

Tackling Mixed Groups (31 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Real Talk SLP, The Dabbling Speechie

Felice Clark shares advice on how to realistically tackle all the areas that stress out SLPs. With practical advice, real life stories and solutions to the many problems speech pathologists face every day in the job, Felice and her guests will give you the inspiration you need to take actionable steps with managing your caseload more efficiently. 

Episode:  Felice interviews Hallie Sherman from Speech Time Fun, who is a school-based SLP working primarily with 5th and 6th grade students.  Because of her large caseload and not always having flexible time slots for seeing her students, Hallie has a lot of mixed groups.  They talk about why mixed groups can be tough and provide some easy solutions to making lesson planning easier.

Talking All Things Professional Development (47 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  Real Talk SLP, The Dabbling Speechie

Felice Clark shares advice on how to realistically tackle all the areas that stress out SLPs. With practical advice, real life stories and solutions to the many problems speech pathologists face every day in the job, Felice and her guests will give you the inspiration you need to take actionable steps with managing your caseload more efficiently. 

Episode:  Felice and her guests talks about the ups and downs of finding relevant, engaging, and practical professional development for the busy SLP.  As SLPs we are pulled very thin between conducting therapy, assessing, and all that fun paperwork.  In particular, school-based SLPs have to be knowledgeable about so many different areas because we treat a lot of disorders and ages.

Technology: Lucas Steuber from Portland, OR (28 min)

Posted October 10, 2019

Podcast:  SLP Trivia Fun, Erik X. Raj

The only game show podcast on the planet where each and every contestant is a speech-language pathologist.  Listen in on entertaining conversations with some of the most interesting clinicians while they play a fun round of SLP inspired trivia.

Episode:  Lucas Steuber from Portland, OR.  Questions about technology and all things augmentative and alternative communication.

What's Not on the Test (46 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  Smarts matter.  But other factors may play an even bigger role in whether someone succeeds.  In this episode, he speaks with Nobel Prize-winning economist James Heckman about the skills that predict how you'll fare in life.  He'll also look at programs that build these skills in the neediest of children – and new research that suggests the benefits of investing in kids and families can last for generations.

What Twins Tell Us (31 min)

Posted July 16, 2019

Podcast:  Hidden Brain, NPR

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Episode:  In December 1988, two pairs of twin boys were born in Colombia.  One twin from each pair was accidentally given to the wrong mother — a mistake that wasn't discovered for decades.  The twins' story is a tragedy, a soap opera, and a science experiment, all rolled into one.  It also gives us clues about the role that genes and the environment play in shaping our identities.  In this episode, he talks with psychologist Nancy Segal about her work with twins, and her encounters with these now-famous brothers.  

When "Ain't" Was Alright (38 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  What we can learn about English from am, the seemingly simplest verb.

Why Do Some Americans Say "Warshed?" (47 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  The letter R has a habit of intruding on spoken English.  How come?

Why Do Southerners Talk That Way? (38 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  Dissecting the distinctive features that make up Southern speech.

Why Is "Ph" Pronounced That Way? (46 min)

Posted July 18, 2019

Podcast:  Lexicon Valley, Slate

John McWhorter is an American academic and linguist who teaches linguistics, philosophy, and music at Columbia University.  He is the author of a number of books on language and on race relations, most recently Words on the Move.

Episode:  John takes a trip down memory lane to share the weekend routine from his teenage years: Saturday morning television, then chores, including cleaning the bathroom with the disinfectant Fantastik.  Why is “ph” pronounced that way? The answer is positively phantastic.

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